Southern African Development Community (SADC)

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The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is a Regional Economic Community/ inter-governmental organization headquartered in Gaborone, Botswana comprising 15 Member States; Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Established in 1992, SADC is committed to Regional Integration and poverty eradication within Southern Africa through economic development and ensuring peace and security.

The Southern African Development Coordinating Conference (SADCC), established on 1 April 1980 was the precursor of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). The SADCC was transformed into the SADC on 17 August 1992 in Windhoek, Namibia where the SADC Treaty was adopted, redefining the basis of cooperation among Member States from a loose association into a legally binding arrangement.

The Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP) and the Strategic Indicative Plan for the Organ (SIPO) remain the guiding frameworks for SADC Regional Integration, providing SADC Member States, SADC Secretariat and other SADC Institutions with consistent and comprehensive programmes of long-term economic and social policies.

Practice Questions
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